Finance for Food contributes to new guidebook outlining financing options for CA businesses

Today the California Financial Opportunities Roundtable (CalFOR), a group of over 90 experts and activists representing large banks, small financial institutions, wealth advisors, fund managers, the business community, and economic development organizations as well as local, state and federal government agencies, released their guidebook Access to Capital

I am proud of the role that Finance for Food played in helping develop this very useful tool for California entrepreneurs seeking capital, and those that would support them! It was a fascinating process, and I only wish I could have spent more time working with the excellent group of people that made it all happen.

The tools in the guide are organized into two main categories of interest to anyone currently seeking financing for their business: 1) Capital that one can currently access from existing sources; and 2) capital that is “available with substantial work” (which is to say, in theory you could raise money in this fashion, but you would have to do some serious legwork to establish and organize such an effort).

As a capital-raising entrepreneur, you will have to sort through several sections of this guide that don’t always relate directly to the experience of actually raising capital. That said, everything in Access to Capital’s 105 pages — including several pages of references — will help you understand the current state of capital markets in California, and this information can help you be more effective in your fundraising efforts.

The comprehensive recommendations in this guide will appeal to audiences beyond fundraising entrepreneurs, including economic development professionals who want to encourage the proliferation and success of small businesses, and would-be “locavestors” who want to invest their money in local ventures.

Funding for this guidebook came from USDA Rural Development in partnership with the California Association of Resource Conservation & Development Councils. It certainly never would have happened were it not for the leadership of the formidable Glenda Humiston, USDA Rural Development’s State Director.

 

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